Pixel Envy

Written by Nick Heer.

Inspector Gadget

New York Magazine’s Kevin Roose asks “Does Anyone Outside Silicon Valley Even Want a Smartwatch?

Short answer: no.

Long answer: noooooooooooooooooooo.

Longer answer:

Despite all the buzz surrounding wearables, it isn’t clear who’s supposed to be buying them. Fewer than half of the respondents to a recent Accenture survey said they would consider buying a smartwatch, and even the most optimistic experts predict only 20 million smartwatch sales this year, a pittance compared with phone and tablet sales. The market’s skepticism might be a function of how early smartwatches fared (few lasted more than a year or two before being pulled from shelves). But more likely is that today’s smartwatches remain mysterious, somewhat redundant gadgets. Even the most sophisticated models don’t do anything a phone can’t do, except sit comfortably on your arm. And the Dick Tracy novelty factor is still high. Silicon Valley code jockeys might appreciate being able to order pizza from their wrists—which is, by the way, a real Android Wear app—but the rest of us don’t have much need for another device to lug around, keep charged, and worry about breaking.

Shorter version of the longer answer: not yet, no.

I, as much as anyone, have dismissed the current generation of wearables. They’re basically second notification screens which, for some, makes sense. But I still don’t get their utility for my own use.

But perhaps it’s still too early. Take, for example, this article by Matthew Miller in ZDNet, in August 2009:

I have tried different tablet devices in the past and I see very little benefit from them for the majority of people. The iPhone/iPod touch seem to be just about as big as you need for a productive web surfing and media consumption device and a tablet Apple really does not make much sense to me.

Or this lovely pile of something from CNet editor Michael Kanellos, in December 2006:

But the iPod looks like it may turn out to be a non-repeatable experience. Look at the historical record. When the iPod emerged in late 2001, it solved some major problems with MP3 players.

[…]

Unfortunately for Apple, problems like that don’t exist in the handset business. Cell phones aren’t clunky, inadequate devices. Instead, they are pretty good. Really good. Why do you think they call it a Crackberry? Because the lumpy design and confusing interface of the device is causing people to break into cars? No, it’s because people are addicted to it.

Or this legendary Clifford Stoll bit in a 1995 issue of Newsweek (remember “issues”?):

The truth in no online database will replace your daily newspaper, no CD-ROM can take the place of a competent teacher and no computer network will change the way government works.

Or let’s go waaayyyyy back to 1977, with your host Ken Olson:

There is no reason anyone would want a computer in their home.

So, let’s not get too hasty, now.