Diversity of Various Tech Companies By the Numbers

With Apple’s report today (finally), major tech companies have all published information about racial and gender diversity. I thought it might be useful to run the numbers and compare them against the demographics of the United States as a whole, for reference. All data is as-reported from each company.

Update: As of October 3, 2014, Microsoft updated their diversity report to be more in-line with the way other tech companies publish their stats. A huge thanks to H. Parker Shelton for adding those stats to my tables for me and emailing me the results, so I don’t have to dick around with HTML tables at about midnight on a Thursday.

Gender Diversity

Almost all available data in this selection of companies solely reports a male/female split. Yahoo is the only company that has an “other/not disclosed” option.

Update: Apple, Google, and Microsoft all have retail operations which are not made distinct from the corporate side. (Thanks to Krishnan Viswanathan for pointing this out.)

Ethic Diversity, USA
Category White Asian Hispanic Black Mixed Other or
Undeclared
USA Overall 79.96% 4.43% 15.1% 12.8% 1.61% 1.15%
USA Workforce (PDF) 80.5% 5.4% 15.3% 11.1% 1.6% 1.2%
Ethnic Diversity in Tech Positions
Company White Asian Hispanic Black Mixed Other or
Undeclared
Apple 54% 23% 7% 6% 2% 8%
Facebook 53% 41% 3% 1% 2% 0%
Google 60% 34% 2% 1% 3% <1%
LinkedIn 34% 60% 3% 1% 1% <1%
Microsoft 57% 35% 4% 2% 1% <1%
Twitter 58% 34% 3% 1% 2% 2%
Yahoo 35% 57% 3% 1% 1% 2%
Ethnic Diversity in Non-Tech Positions
Company White Asian Hispanic Black Mixed Other or
Undeclared
Apple 56% 14% 9% 9% 3% 9%
Facebook 63% 24% 6% 2% 4% 1%
Google 65% 23% 4% 3% 5% <1%
LinkedIn 63% 26% 5% 3% 3% <1%
Microsoft 70% 14% 8% 6% 1% <1%
Twitter 60% 23% 3% 4% 5% 5%
Yahoo 63% 24% 6% 3% 2% 2%
Ethnic Diversity in Leadership/Executive Positions

The “USA” row uses the “management occupations” data from the BLS document above, as a rough and imperfect approximation of the broad US national trend.

Company White Asian Hispanic Black Mixed Other or
Undeclared
USA (PDF, pg. 24) 85.7% 5.1% 8.8% 6.9% N/A N/A
Apple 64% 21% 6% 3% N/A 6%
Facebook 74% 19% 4% 2% 1% 0%
Google 72% 23% 1% 2% 1.5% <1%
LinkedIn 65% 28% 4% 1% 3% <1%
Microsoft 72% 21% 4% 2% 1% <1%
Twitter 72% 24% 0% 2% 0% 2%
Yahoo 63% 24% 6% 3% 2% 2%

Analysis

Let’s get something out of the way: I’m a white twenty-something Canadian who graduated from art college. Analysis of statistics of racial and gender diversity at American tech companies is not exactly my strongest suit. But, hey, you’ve made it this far. I want to be as fair as possible to everyone represented in these stats. If there’s a problem, please let me know.

  • As noted above, the data available from all companies only reports a male/female split. While it would be imprudent for an employer to ask for more information, it does misrepresent individuals of other genders.
  • It will come as no surprise that all of these companies are boys’ clubs, particularly tech workers and those in leadership roles. This is one of the biggest issues facing the tech industry right now.
  • Stereotypes are proving quite strong with the significant over-representation of those of Asian descent at all companies surveyed.
  • Black employees are, on the other hand, significantly under-represented. Like the under-representation of women in tech companies, this suggests a much larger and more overreaching issue. I’d argue that this is another of the biggest issues facing the tech industry.
  • Only a single data point was typically made available in a given category. Microsoft was an exception, showing how their diversity has changed over the past few years. I think it would be valuable for the surveyed companies to release similar data from past years. I mention this not because I want a feel-good kind of statistic, but because I’d like to see if progress is, indeed, being made, and at what rate.
  • Generally, only ethnicity and gender data was provided by the companies surveyed. As several of the reports stated, diversity is so much more than just these two genetic features. It would be inappropriate for employers to ask about sexual orientation, childhood household income, and so forth, but these qualities are part of what shapes internal diversity. Poor families — or even most middle-class families — can’t afford to send their kids to Stanford.

Written daily by Nick Heer in Calgary, and around the world.

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